EVENTS

Events

The Fanning the Flames Speaker Series highlights conversations with leading scholars of modern East Asian history, art, and propaganda and is presented in conjunction with the launch of the book, website, and physical exhibition.

Upcoming Events

Cossak's Breakfast
November 5, 2021 | 12:00 pm | Online
Holding the Sword of Damocles: Japan in Russian and Soviet Popular Images, 1904-1945

Walter E. Havighurst Professor of History and Director, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University

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Stephen Norris
Stephen Norris

Stephen M. Norris is the Walter E. Havighurst Professor of Russian History and the Director of the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies at Miami University. Norris’s research focuses on modern Russian history with an emphasis on visual culture and propaganda since the 19th Century. He is the author of, A War of Images: Russian Popular Prints, Wartime Culture, and National Identity, 1812-1945 (Northern Illinois University Press, 2006), and Blockbuster History in the New Russia: Movies, Memory, Patriotism (Indiana University Press, 2012).

Robert Conquest Curator for Russia and Eurasia, Hoover Institution Library & Archives

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Anatol Shmelev
Anatol Shmelev

Anatol Shmelev is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Robert Conquest Curator of the Russia and Eurasia Collection at Hoover’s Library & Archives, and the project archivist for its Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Collection. Shmelev’s expertise is in twentieth-century Russian history, specializing in the Russian Civil War. As curator, he is principally responsible for acquiring archival materials relating to Russia, the Soviet Union, and the independent states that emerged from the USSR after 1991.

Fuchida-Map
December 7, 2021 | 3:00 pm | Online
Historiography of the Pacific War: Past Accomplishments and Future Challenges

In commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Hoover Institution Library & Archives is pleased to host a panel of leading military historians of the Pacific War. This panel takes a fresh look at research trends and accomplishments in the past eight decades and discusses new challenges and missions for the next generation of students and researchers of World War II in Asia and the Pacific.

 

This event also marks Hoover's recent acquisition of the Mitsuo Fuchida Papers, generously gifted by his family. Captain Fuchida, the lead bomber aviator in the first wave of the Pearl Harbor attack, also gained new prominence in the postwar period due, among other things, to the publication of Midway: The Battle that Doomed Japan, the Japanese Navy's Story (1955), a highly influential account of the Battle of Midway albeit with its strengths and flaws. Taking Fuchidaʻs controversial legacy as the point of departure, this panel reflects upon the complex process of the trans-Pacific knowledge production and transfer concerning the Pacific War in the past eight decades and considers the future directions in researching World War II in Asia and the Pacific.

Professor in the GW Department of History, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

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Ronald Spector
Ronald Spector

Adjunct lecturer for the U.S. Naval War College

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Jonathan Parshall
Jonathan Parshall

Military historian, lawyer, and U.S. Army veteran

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Richard Frank
Richard Frank

Professor of Japan, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

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Yuma Totani
Yuma Totani

Past Events

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A Visual Revolution: The Emperor in Popular Prints
10.5. 2021
2019c113_027_crop
October 5, 2021 | 4:00 pm | Online
A Visual Revolution: The Emperor in Popular Prints

The popularization of images of the reigning emperor of Japan was one among many radical changes of the Meiji period. But it was not a simple matter of indiscriminately showing his face and form in commercial prints. This talk investigates the various ways that the emperor became visible and legible, by considering Japanese and foreign conventions of portraiture and visual representation. It also considers the effects and limitations of the new visibility. This event also celebrates the launch of the Fanning the Flames: Propaganda in Modern Japan website and online exhibition.

Alice Y. Tseng is the department chair of History of Art and Architecture at Boston University.

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Alice Y. Tseng
Alice Y. Tseng

Alice Y. Tseng is the department chair of History of Art and Architecture at Boston University. Her research focuses on Japan from the nineteenth century to the present, especially the history of cities, buildings, and the visual arts in response to exchanges with Europe and the United States. Other areas of interest are histories of collections and exhibitions, and the visual and spatial representations of Japan’s modern monarchy. Tseng is the author of The Imperial Museums of Meiji Japan: Architecture and the Art of the Nation (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2008), Kyoto Visual Culture in the Early Edo and Meiji Periods: The Arts of Reinvention, coedited with M. Pitelka (Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2016), and Modern Kyoto: Building for Ceremony and Commemoration, 1868–1940 (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2018). Her research has appeared in major disciplinary journals, including the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, the Art Bulletin, the Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and the Journal of Japanese Studies.

Bowman Family Professor of History, Stanford University

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Matthew Sommer
Matthew Sommer

Matthew Sommer is the Bowman Family professor of History at Stanford University. He is a social and legal historian of China in the Qing dynasty (1644-1912) whose research focuses on gender, sexuality, and family. He is the author of Sex, Law, and Society in Late Imperial China (Stanford University Press, 2000) and Polyandry an Wife-Selling in Qing Dynasty China: Survival Strategies and Judicial Interventions (University of California Press, 2015).

Anchors of History
Anchors of History: The Long Shadow of Japanese Imperial Propaganda
06.1. 2021
Anchors of History
June 1, 2021 | 12:00 pm | Online
Anchors of History: The Long Shadow of Japanese Imperial Propaganda

Barak Kushner considers war booty collected by the Japanese military navy taken from the Qing Empire at the end of the First Sino-Japanese War and displayed for the purpose of state propaganda. Half a century later much of this material was repatriated to China and is now poised in a revolutionary military museum in central Beijing. A discussion with Michael Auslin about the relics of war follows Kushner’s lecture.

Barak Kushner is professor of East Asian history and the chair of Japanese Studies in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge.

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BARAK KUSHNER
BARAK KUSHNER

Barak Kushner is professor of East Asian history and the chair of Japanese Studies in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge. He has edited numerous books and written several monographs, including the award winning Men to Devils, Devils to Men: Japanese War Crimes and Chinese Justice (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015). In 2020 he hosted several episodes of a major Chinese documentary on Japanese war crimes and is currently writing a book titled The Construction of Injustice in East Asia: Japan versus Its Neighbors. Kushner was a visiting fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, 2019–20, and a visiting professor at Waseda University in Tokyo. He is also a guest professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He received the fifteenth Nakasone Yasuhiro Award for Excellence in 2019. His research projects have received funding from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, the Toshiba Foundation, and the European Research Council. Abridged Barak Kushner is professor of East Asian history and the chair of Japanese Studies in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge. He has edited numerous books and written several monographs, including the award winning Men to Devils, Devils to Men: Japanese War Crimes and Chinese Justice (2015). In 2020 he hosted several episodes of a major Chinese documentary on Japanese war crimes and is currently writing a book titled The Construction of Injustice in East Asia: Japan versus Its Neighbors. He received the fifteenth Nakasone Yasuhiro Award for Excellence in 2019. His research projects have received funding from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, the Toshiba Foundation, and the European Research Council.

Michael R. Auslin is the Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

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Michael R. Auslin
Michael R. Auslin

Michael R. Auslin is the Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. A historian by training, he specializes in US policy in Asia and geopolitical issues in the Indo-Pacific region. His publications include Negotiating with Imperialism: The Unequal Treaties and the Culture of Japanese Diplomacy (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004) and Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific (Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 2020). Auslin was an associate professor of history at Yale University, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the senior adviser for Asia at the Halifax International Security Forum, and a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He has been named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Fulbright scholar, and a Marshall Memorial Fellow by the German Marshall Fund, among other honors. Abridged: Michael R. Auslin is the Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. A historian by training, he specializes in US policy in Asia and geopolitical issues in the Indo-Pacific region. His publications include Negotiating with Imperialism: The Unequal Treaties and the Culture of Japanese Diplomacy (2004) and Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific (2020). He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the senior adviser for Asia at the Halifax International Security Forum, and a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. He has been named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Fulbright scholar, and a Marshall Memorial Fellow by the German Marshall Fund.

June10-2021
“War Fever” as Fueled by the Media and Popular Culture: The Path Taken by Meiji Japan's Policies of “Enrich the Country” and “Strengthen the Armed Forces”
06.10. 2021
June10-2021
June 10, 2021 | 12:00 pm | Online
“War Fever” as Fueled by the Media and Popular Culture: The Path Taken by Meiji Japan's Policies of “Enrich the Country” and “Strengthen the Armed Forces”

Professor Toshihiko Kishi discusses Japan and East Asia more than 100 years ago, and the relationship between power, media, and popular culture. In the 1890s, the Meiji government of Japan started on the path of modernization and proceeded to invade the Korean Peninsula, China, and Taiwan. The "war fever" fanned by the government was closely related to the emerging technologies of publishing and printing. Following Kishi’s presentation, Kay Ueda moderates questions from the audience.

Toshihiko Kishi is a professor at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University.

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TOSHIHIKO KISHI
TOSHIHIKO KISHI

Toshihiko Kishi is a professor at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University. His research covers 20th-century Asian history, East Asian regional studies, and media studies. He is the author of Visual Media in Manchukuo: Posters, Postcards and Stamps (2010), East Asian Popular Songs Hour: Crossing Boundaries and Crossing Musicians (2013), and The Postwar History of Sino-Japanese Submarine Cables: Normalization of Diplomatic Relations and the Rebirth of Communications (2015), and is the coeditor of Enlightening through TV: USCAR Public Diplomacy, 1950–1972 (2020). Professor Kishi is also a member of the Science Council of Japan and a senior researcher at the Research Center for Science Systems, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Curator of the Japanese Diaspora Collection at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives

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Kaoru (Kay) Ueda
Kaoru (Kay) Ueda

Kaoru (Kay) Ueda is the curator of the Japanese Diaspora Collection at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives. She curated many of the materials used in Fanning the Flames: Propaganda in Modern Japan (Hoover Institution Press, 2021)  and forthcoming exhibition. Ueda manages the Japanese Diaspora Initiative, endowed by an anonymous gift to promote the study of overseas Japanese history during the Empire of Japan period. She is also the editor of On a Collision Course: The Dawn of Japanese Migration in the Nineteenth Century (Hoover Institution Press, 2020).

Aug26-2021
Kamishibai (paper plays) & the Mobilization of Women in Wartime Japan
08.26. 2021
Aug26-2021
August 26, 2021 | 12:00 pm |
Kamishibai (paper plays) & the Mobilization of Women in Wartime Japan

Women were crucial to Japan’s war effort from 1937, when the China War started, until 1945 when WWII ended. Whether organizing neighborhood meetings, laboring in factories, or just trying to feed their families under conditions of increasing food shortages, women had important roles to play in sustaining the war. Kamishibai (paper plays) were a propaganda medium considered especially appropriate for the mobilization of women. This presentation explores the implicit and explicit messages to women in wartime kamishibai.

Head of Asian Studies Department and Professor of Modern Japanese Literature and Popular Culture, University of British Columbia

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Sharalyn Orbaugh
Sharalyn Orbaugh

Sharalyn Orbaugh specializes in modern Japanese literature and popular culture and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of British Columbia where she also serves as head of the Asian Studies department. She is the author of Japanese Fiction of the Allied Occupation (Brill, 2007) and Propaganda Performed: Kamishibai in Japan’s Fifteen Year War (Brill, 2015) and editor of a forthcoming reference work, The Columbia Companion to Modern Japanese Literature. She received her PhD in Far Eastern Languages and Literatures from the University of Michigan, and spent six years at UC Berkeley before joining UBC in 1997.

Curator of the Japanese Diaspora Collection at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives

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Kaoru (Kay) Ueda
Kaoru (Kay) Ueda

Kaoru (Kay) Ueda is the curator of the Japanese Diaspora Collection at the Hoover Institution Library & Archives. She curated many of the materials used in Fanning the Flames: Propaganda in Modern Japan (Hoover Institution Press, 2021)  and forthcoming exhibition. Ueda manages the Japanese Diaspora Initiative, endowed by an anonymous gift to promote the study of overseas Japanese history during the Empire of Japan period. She is also the editor of On a Collision Course: The Dawn of Japanese Migration in the Nineteenth Century (Hoover Institution Press, 2020).